Commission from Réseaux des arts médiatiques/ AKOUSMA

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Happy New Year to you (whoever you are)… and I suppose with this news, Happy New Year to me as well!

I’m truly delighted to announce that Montréal electroacoustic music presenter Réseaux des arts médiatiques has successfully commissioned a new 20-minute multichannel fixed-media piece from me for the 10th Anniversary of their AKOUSMA Festival in Fall 2013.  I’m really grateful for their patience in acquiring the funding, and I’m also thankful for said support from the Canada Council for the Arts.  This is an incredible opportunity for me.

I attended last year’s installment of AKOUSMA and the diversity and integrity of their programming made this then-potential commission feel all the more exciting.  The lineup included Francisco López, Daniel Menche, Keith Fullerton Whitman, Manuella Blackburn, Martin Tétreault, and others.

It’s clear that Artistic Director (and eclectic, fascinating composer) Louis Dufort and others in charge of programming are committed to representing an array of electroacoustic practices, both inside and outside of the academic traditions/ practices.  Being a fan of work from the entire gamut of electronic music, this sensibility appeals to me greatly. Of course, it’s super well-curated, not some flung-together dog’s breakfast of disparate music.  It’s an honour to be included.

The clarity, precision and depth, too afforded by the amazing multichannel sound-system they installed at Usine C was spectacular.  Of what I saw, López’s concert was particularly effective as he was able to conjure an acute sense in audience of proximity to his sounds, as well as real distance too.

I’m beyond excited to be able to use this system myself for my own new piece.

The current plan is to construct a work using various instrumental sound sources, and a very limited approach to electronic processing. My hope is to merely employ the computer simply for the purposes of layering/ editing, enhancing and spatializing the sound, rather than drastically modifying textures and timbres with digital effects etc.  Any of those effects would be achieved through “orchestration”, instrumental techniques, preparation of the instruments, mic placement, and maybe also the use of re-recording through alternate speakers and/ or recording media, overdriving equipment and perhaps mixer feedback.  I have not yet decided on these limits for the work, but I know I want to focus on combining and recording instrumental sounds in a compelling manner, but one that relates to electroacoustic practices as much as instrumental music principles.

Excitement is already on the horizon for 2013!

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About Nick Storring

Nick Storring is a Toronto based composer, cellist and electronic musician with a wide palette of interests. Awarded the Canadian Music Centre's 2011 Emerging Composer Award, his broken-violin-based electronic piece Artifacts (I) also won first place in the 2008 Jeux de Temps/ Times Play competition for emerging Canadian electroacoustic composers. His chamber music has been performed by the Quatuor Bozzini, Arraymusic, the Madawaska String Quartet, the Esprit Orchestra, and Thin Edge New Music Collective. He also regularly creates incidental music for theatre, film and intermedia projects, including for the MT Space's Last 15 Seconds which toured through Canada and the Middle East, ambient gaming installation "Tentacles" which was presented at MoMA in 2011, and Ingrid Veninger's feature film "The Animal Project" an official selection at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival. Apart from making regular solo appearances, he also plays in Picastro (Polyvinyl Records), I Have Eaten The City and improvising cello duo The Knot with Tilman Lewis. He has collaborated live and in the studio with Nadja, Sandro Perri, Daniel Johnston, Araz Salek, Laura Barrett, Rhys Chatham, Wyrd Visions, Andrew Timar, Castlemusic, Eddie Prevost, Diane Labrosse, and Damo Suzuki (of Can).
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